Tagged “web”

Entry

Images on the Web: The Big Picture, Part 1

In modern web development there are a myriad ways to present an image on a web page and it can often feel pretty baffling. In this series I step through the options, moving from basic to flexible images; then from modern responsive images to the new CSS for fitting different sized images into a common shape. By the end I’ll arrive at a flexible, modern boilerplate for images.

Read entry »

Bookmark

Front-of-the-front-end and back-of-the-front-end web development (by Brad Frost)

The Great Divide between so-called front-end developers is real! Here, Brad Frost proposes some modern role definitions.

A front-of-the-front-end developer is a web developer who specializes in writing HTML, CSS, and presentational JavaScript code.

A back-of-the-front-end developer is a web developer who specializes in writing JavaScript code necessary to make a web application function properly.

Read my notes / Visit original

Bookmark

Vanilla JS List

Here’s Chris Ferdinandi’s curated list of organisations which use vanilla JS to build websites and web apps.

You don’t need a heavyweight JavaScript framework, and vanilla JS does scale.

Read my notes / Visit original

Bookmark

Use CSS Clamp to create a more flexible wrapper utility (on Piccalilli)

Here’s Andy Bell recommending using CSS clamp() to control your wrapper/container width because it supports setting a preferred value in vw to ensure sensible gutters combined with a maximum tolerance in rem—all in a single line of code.

If we use clamp() to use a viewport unit as the ideal and use what we would previously use as the max-width as the clamp’s maximum value, we get a much more flexible setup.

Read my notes / Visit original

Bookmark

Comparing Browsers for Responsive Design (on CSS-Tricks)

Chris Coyier checks out Sizzy, Polypane et al and decides which suits him best.

There are a number of these desktop apps where the goal is showing your site at different dimensions all at the same time. So you can, for example, be writing CSS and making sure it’s working across all the viewports in a single glance.

Read my notes / Visit original

Entry

Progressively enhanced JavaScript In Real Life

Over the last couple of days I’ve witnessed a good example of progressive enhancement “In Real Life”. And I think it’s good to log and share these validations of web development best practices when they happen so that their benefits can be seen as real rather than theoretical.

Read entry »

Bookmark

How-to: Create accessible forms - The A11Y Project

Here are five bite-sized and practical chunks of advice for creating accessible forms.

  1. Always label your inputs.
  2. Highlight input elements on focus.
  3. Break long forms into smaller sections/pages.
  4. Provide error messages (rather than just colour-based indicators)
  5. Avoid horizontal layout forms unless necessary.

Read my notes / Visit original

Bookmark

Cheating Entropy with Native Web Technologies (on Jim Nielsen’s Weblog)

This is why, over years of building for the web, I have learned that I can significantly cut down on the entropy my future self will have to face by authoring web projects in vanilla HTML, CSS, and JS. I like to ask myself questions like:

  • Could this be done with native ES modules instead of using a bundler?
  • Could I do this with DOM scripting instead of using a JS framework?
  • Could I author this in CSS instead of choosing a preprocessor?

Read my notes / Visit original

Bookmark

itty.bitty

Here’s an interesting tool for creating and sharing small-ish web pages without having to build a website or organise hosting.

itty.bitty takes html (or other data), compresses it into a URL fragment, and provides a link that can be shared. When it is opened, it inflates that data on the receiver’s side.

Read my notes / Visit original

Bookmark

Bustle

Here’s a beautiful, magazine style website design for digital publication Bustle. The typography, use of whitespace, responsive layout, menu pattern, colour palette and imagery are all on point!

Read my notes / Visit original

Bookmark

Accessibility (on adactio.com)

Here’s Jeremy Keith, making the moral case for accessible websites and why we shouldn’t use “you can make more money by not turning people away” as an argument:

I understand how it’s useful to have the stats and numbers to hand should you need to convince a sociopath in your organisation, but when numbers are used as the justification, you’re playing the numbers game from then on. You’ll probably have to field questions like ”Well, how many screen reader users are visiting our site anyway?” (To which the correct answer is “I don’t know and I don’t care” – even if the number is 1, the website should still be accessible because it’s the right thing to do.)

Read my notes / Visit original

Bookmark

Font Match

A font pairing app that helps you match fonts – useful for pairing a webfont with a suitable fallback. You can place the fonts on top of each other, side by side, or in the same line. You can adjust your fallback font’s size and position to get a great match.

Bookmark

Font style matcher

If you’re using a web font, you're bound to see a flash of unstyled text (or FOUC), between the initial render of your websafe font and the webfont that you’ve chosen. This usually results in a jarring shift in layout, due to sizing discrepancies between the two fonts. To minimize this discrepancy, you can try to match the fallback font and the intended webfont’s x-heights and widths. This tool helps you do exactly that.

Read my notes / Visit original

Bookmark

Cassie Evans’s Blog

I love Cassie Evans’s new website design! It’s so full of personality while loaded with technical goodies too. Amazing work!

(via @stugoo)

Entry

JavaScript Arrow Functions

JavaScript arrow functions are one of those bits of syntax about which I occasionally have a brain freeze. Here’s a quick refresher for those moments.

Read entry »

Note · 10:10 AM · Glasgow

I have to reluctanctly agree on this one. I’ve interviewed quite a few candidates for “front-end developer” (or similarly named) positions over recent years and the recurring pattern is that they are strong on JavaScript (though not necessarily the right time to use it) and weak on HTML, CSS and the “bigger picture”.

Entry

Testing Stimulus Controllers

Stimulus JS is great but doesn’t provide any documentation for testing controllers, so here’s some of my own that I’ve picked up.

Required 3rd-party libraries #

Basic Test #

// hello_controller.test.js
import { Application as StimulusApp } from "stimulus";
import HelloController from "path/to/js/hello_controller";

describe("HelloController", () => {
beforeEach(() => {
// Insert the HTML and register the controller
document.body.innerHTML = `
<div data-controller="hello">
<input data-target="hello.name" type="text">
<button data-action="click->hello#greet">
Greet
</button>
<span data-target="hello.output">
</span>
</div>
`
;
StimulusApp.start().register('hello', HelloController);
})

it("inserts a greeting using the name given", () => {
const helloOutput = document.querySelector("[data-target='hello.output']");
const nameInput = document.querySelector("[data-target='hello.name']");
const greetButton = document.querySelector("button");
// Change the input value and click the greet button
nameInput.value = "Laurence";
greetButton.click();
// Check we have the correct greeting
expect(helloOutput).toHaveTextContent("Hello, Laurence!");
})
})
Entry

My Ruby and Rails Cheatsheet

I’m no Ruby engineer however even as a front-end developer I’m sometimes called upon to work on Rails applications that require me to know my way around. Here are my notes and reminders.

Read entry »

Bookmark

Intrinsically Responsive CSS Grid with minmax and min

Evan Minto notes that flexible grids created with CSS Grid’s repeat, auto-fill, and minmax are only intrinsically responsive (responsive to their container rather than the viewport) up to a point, because when the container width is narrower than the minimum width specified in minmax the grid children overflow.

Read my notes / Visit original

Entry

Certbot Troubleshooting

When taking the DIY approach to building a new server, Certbot is a great option for installing secure certificates. However, sometimes you can run into problems. Here, I review the main recurring issues I’ve encountered and how I fixed them.

Read entry »

Bookmark

Image Color

A handy tool for identifying colours – provided in numerous different CSS-ready formats – and creating a complimentary colour palette from an image you upload or provide as a URL.

Read my notes / Visit original

Bookmark

Namecheap

I’ve heard a couple of people mention that when they buy domain names, they use Namecheap because they are cheap and trustworthy.

Read my notes / Visit original

Entry

The best way to Install Node.js and NPM on a Mac

In modern front-end development, we tend to use a number of JavaScript-based build tools (such as task runners like Gulp) which have been created using Node.js and which we install using NPM. Here’s the best way I’ve found for installing and maintaining Node and NPM on a Mac.

Read entry »

See all tags.

External Link Bookmark Note Entry Search