Tagged “performance”

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Big picture performance analysis using Lighthouse Parade (on Cloud Four)

I like the sound of this performance analysis tool from the clever folks at Cloud Four, especially because it covers your entire site rather than just a single page.

Lighthouse Parade is a Node.js command line tool that crawls a domain and gathers lighthouse performance data for every page. With a single command, the tool will crawl an entire site, run a Lighthouse report for each page, and then output a spreadsheet with the aggregated data.

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Note · 10:15 PM · Glasgow

Daniel Post shared a really cool performance-optimisation trick for Eleventy on Twitter the other day. When statically generating your site you can loop through your pages and, for each, use PurgeCSS to find the required CSS, then inline that into the <head>. This way, each page contains only the CSS it needs and no more!

Check out the code.

I’ve just installed this on my personal site. I was already inlining my CSS into the <head> but the promise of only including the minimum CSS that each specific page needs was too good to resist.

Turned out it was a breeze to get working, a nice introduction to Eleventy transforms, and so far it’s working great!

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We’ve ruined the Web. Here’s how we fix it. (This is HCD podcast)

During the COVID situation, people have an urgent need to access critical information online. But in 2020, the average webpage is rammed full of large JavaScript files, huge images etc, and as a result is slow to load. This problem is likely to be most keenly felt by those who don’t have the luxury of fast internet – potentially the same people who need access to that critical information the most.

Here’s a brilliant discussion between Gerry McGovern and Jeremy Keith on that problem, suggesting tactics to help fix things such as performance budgets, introducing tactics at the design stage to mimic slow connections and other access constraints, optimising for return visits, progressive enhancement and more.

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CSS Triggers

Check whether or not a CSS property is a good candidate for smooth animation based on whether updates to its value trigger expensive changes (to, for example, “element geometry”) causing layout updates and repaints.

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When should you add the defer attribute to the script element? (on Go Make Things)

For many years I’ve placed script elements just before the closing body tag rather than in the <head>. Since a standard <script> element is render-blocking, the theory is that by putting it at the end of the document – after the main content of the page has loaded – it’s no longer blocking anything, and there’s no need to wrap it in a DOMContentLoaded event listener.

It turns out that my time-honoured default is OK, but there is a better approach.

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Lazy load embedded YouTube videos (CSS-Tricks)

This is a very clever idea via Arthur Corenzan. Rather than use the default YouTube embed, which adds a crapload of resources to a page whether the user plays the video or not, use the little tiny placeholder webpage that is just an image you can click that is linked to the YouTube embed.

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